Thursday, May 6, 2021
HomecommentMark's History: A family affair on Rock Lane

Mark’s History: A family affair on Rock Lane

Words & Photos: Mark Stevenson

An old postcard showing Rock Lane.

You know when a king has a son and they name their sons after themselves, like Henry Vll naming his son Henry for example? Well, the Horn family seem to have carried on that tradition.

Thompson Horn (born 1843) named his son Thompson (born 1877), who in turn named his son Thompson (born 1905).

Thompson (1843) was originally from Rawdon and in 1871 was living at Gang House in Bramley (roughly where the grassy area is at the back of the houses on Ganner’s Road) with his wife Ellen and three children. His occupation was that of a Forgeman.

In 1881 Thompson (1843) was living at Warley Camp in Bramley and is still married to Ellen and still working as a Forgeman, but he had also branched out to be a market gardener with his eldest son Harry. Harry, at 16, also worked as a Forgeman. Thompson (1843) now had six children, one of whom was four-year-old Thompson (1877).

In 1891 nothing much has changed in the Horn family, other than the fact that they are now living at Bee Hive, Whitecote.

In 1901 Thompson (1843) is no longer a Forgeman, his occupation is now just that of a market gardener. His son Thompson (1877), now 24, is also a market gardener. The Horn’s address is that of Beehive Garden, Whitecote.

In 1911 Thompson (1843) has passed away and his wife Ellen is living at Beehive House on Rock Lane, whilst her son is living at Beehive Garden, Rock Lane with his wife Annie, two children and aunt Anne Mallorie (aged 74). Thompson (1905) is one of the two children and his middle name is Mallorie. Thompson Mallorie Horn.

Beehive House is 14a Rock Lane and Beehive Garden is 14 Rock Lane. Today the address is 34 and 36 Rock Lane. The two old buildings on Rock Lane were probably built around the time the USA was fighting for its independence.

Interestingly today – and at least from the 1890’s onwards – it is just two cottages but in the 1840’s there were three cottages on the plot of land owned by John Tattersall and occupied by Joseph Hardaker and others. 

WLD reported earlier this week on plans to restore the Listed cottages.

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