West Leeds: Will these pedestrian improvements tackle road accident hotspots?

8 July 2019

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Accident hotspots across West Leeds are set to benefit from new road safety measures in a bid to tackle the number of pedestrians being knocked over and injured.

A report issued by Leeds City Council has identified a number of sites of concern in Bramley, Pudsey and Stanningley, which will receive road safety measures or new criossings in a bid to cut down the number of accidents and increase road safety for pedestrians.

The measures form part of a £400,000 city-wide scheme to be implemented this financial year, subject to consultation with the community.

Schemes in West Leeds earmarked for cash include:

Henconner Lane, Bramley – South of Greenthorpe Road

A zebra crossing is recommended as the route serves local schools. A council report says:

“Pedestrians experience significant delays and difficulty when crossing due to a combination of reasons which include the close proximity of the side road junctions, on street parking and the vertical road alignment.

“On-site observations confirm that many motorists choose to drive between the residential estates at school pick up and drop off times as opposed to walking and having to cross the road.”

Half Mile Lane, Stanningley

The report says:

“Whilst on site observations confirm road users can cross here with very little delay it is made difficult due to the compact nature of the site and closeness of parking, junction and busy car park access.

“In summary, due to the benefits this scheme would provide for the wider community and the need to highlight the crossing point to ensure better compliance it is recommended that a parallel crossing is introduced on the existing speed table.”

The following site has been investigated and, whilst it does not meet the criteria for a formal crossing it has other forms of improvement recommended:

Kent Road, Pudsey

The road has issues with school pupils leaving Crawshaw Academy. The report concludes:

“The number of pedestrian crossing at this location is very much concentrated at school pick up and drop off times and the crossing difficulty is made worse by the presence of parking linked to this. As a result the site has experienced three accidents in the past five years; one was serious and two had a severity rating of slight.

“At all other times of the day the road is clear, crossing is not difficult and can take place without delay. In summary, even with the high number of pedestrian crossing movements, it is recommended that the site, in the immediate vicinity of the school entrance, would benefit from, and be protected by, parking restrictions and informal facilities in the form of dropped kerbs and tactile paving.”

The following site is an existing pedestrian crossing facility and, following investigation, requires minor alterations:

Stanningley Road, Bramley – near  junction with Elmfield Way

Over the past five years this crossing has experienced a total of seven recorded collisions, one person was seriously injured.

The council wants to stagger the existing zebra crossing with a pedestrian island and improvements to the street lighting and belisha beacons.

The 2019 Annual Pedestrian Crossing Review can be read in full here.

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