Radcliffe Lane Day Centre

D-Day for Radcliffe Lane Day Centre and Middlecross Care Home

14 September 2016

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Leeds City Council looks set to rubberstamp the closure of Middlecross Care Home in Armley and Radcliffe Lane Day Centre in Pudsey next week.

Senior councillors on the decision-making executive board will discuss the future of a number of the authority’s residential care homes and day centres at a meeting next week.

Copuncillors are being asked to approve the closure of Middlecross Care Home in Armley, Seigen Manor in Morley and The Green in Seacroft along with their associated day centres.

Radcliffe Lane day centre in Pudsey also faces closure. Wykebeck Valley day centre will become a complex needs centre for the east of the city.

GMB home closure protest

A protest was held outside Leeds Civic Hall last year about proposed care home closures. Photo: Tim Roache, GMB/Twitter

The decision comes despite a campaign to save Middlecross and 450-name petition to save Radcliffe Lane.

A report to be considered by councillors says a consultation with service users revealed the majority of respondents didn’t want the home/day centre to close. Many suggested that savings should be made elsewhere in the council.

In a statement, Councillor Rebecca Charlwood, Leeds City Council’s executive member for health, wellbeing and adults, said:

“The stark reality is that the council’s current financial position means we simply cannot afford to provide residential and day care in the same way we have in the past, and we must put robust, sustainable models in place now so that older people in Leeds will still have choice and control over the care and support they receive both now and in the future.

“The numbers of people moving into traditional residential care has been falling for several years, and older people we work with have told us they want to live in their own home and keep their independence for as long as they possibly can, so our focus has been on supporting them to have that option wherever we’re able to.

“Above all, our primary goal is to ensure older people in Leeds can still depend on good quality care and we have spent considerable time and effort to make sure any changes reflect good practice and take into account cares and concerns from service users and others.”

Ahead of next week’s executive board meeting, letters have been sent to all affected residents, their families and carers, and staff, advising them of the recommendations.

A full copy of the executive board report can be read here.




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David Dixon says:

In a statement, Councillor Rebecca Charlwood, Leeds City Council’s executive member for health, wellbeing and adults, said:

“The stark reality is that the council’s current financial position means we simply cannot afford to provide residential and day care in the same way we have in the past …”

Obscene hypocrisy

Central government let LCC keep the £170 MILLION granted for the subsequently shelved tram scheme

They waste £30 million on a white elephant cycle superhighway no one wants & no one uses (in real terms), including spending £70,000 creating parking spaces for ONE business

The ‘stark reality of the councils current financial position’ is, in fact, obviously more one of obscene waste & pure folly